Do you need a thermometer? Candle Making Temperature Guide


Candle making is a fun and easy hobby for people of all ages. However, using the right supplies and equipment is essential to make candles that look and smell great. One of the most critical tools for candle making is a thermometer. This article will discuss why thermometers are essential when making candles, the temperature to add fragrance oils and essential oils, the melting points of different waxes and when to pour them, the flash points of different waxes and why it is important, what types of thermometers are available, and how to choose the right one for your needs.

You need a thermometer for candle making. The thermometer will allow you to monitor optimal temperatures for adding your fragrance oil, colour dye, and the correct pouring temperature. It will also ensure you do not heat the wax past the flash point, increasing the chance of a fire.

We will now review the temperatures that you need to carry out critical steps in the candle-making process, what you need to consider when purchasing a thermometer and what risks are associated with not using a thermometer. Read on for more!

Do you need a thermometer for candle making?

You need a thermometer for candle making. Thermometers help ensure that the wax is at the correct temperature for pouring, melting, adding fragrance oil, and mixing your chosen dye.

If the wax becomes too hot at these stages of the process, it can significantly impact the finished product’s fragrance, colour, and overall burn quality. This also occurs when the wax is not heated enough and is too cold to allow the correct synergies between the melted wax and added components.

Why is it essential to use a thermometer when making candles?

Thermometers are essential when making candles because they help you monitor the wax’s temperature. If the wax is too hot, it will affect the finished product and may cause a fire hazard during the melting process. This happens when your candle reaches the flash point temperature of your specific wax. We will talk more about this later in the article.

We will now review the benefits and risks of not using a thermometer during the candle-making process.

What are some of the benefits of using a thermometer when making candles?

There are several benefits of using a thermometer while making candles including:

  • They help you monitor the temperature of the wax.
  • Thermometers reduce the risks of creating a fire hazard.
  • You can ensure the fragrance’s potency is not impacted allowing you to produce the desired scent.
  • You will avoid adding colour dye at the wrong temperature affecting the desired colour.
  • They make it easier to pour the wax at the right temperature, ensuring an even surface and candle burn.

Are there any risks associated with not using a thermometer when making candles?

In case you are thinking about making a candle without a thermometer, you need to know that there are potential risks; we have listed them below:

  • Not using a thermometer when making candles often produces a poor end product.
  • You may cause a fire when you heat your wax above the flash point of your specific wax if exposed to an open flame.
  • You may pour the wax at too high or too low of a temperature which can cause issues including smoking, uneven burning, and lost fragrance potency.
  • Adding colour dye at the wrong temperature will not provide the desired colour and can cause fading.
  • Adding the fragrance oil at the incorrect temperature can impact your candles’ cold and hot throw.
  • You will not be able to repeat the process of creating the same candle twice without measurable variables.

At what temperature does wax melt?

In general, candle wax melts between 100°F (38°C) and 180°F (82°C). This range is highly dependent on several factors:

  • The type of wax being used.
  • How much fragrance oil is being added to the wax.
  • If any other additives are being used in the wax.

Below you will find a table for the different types of candle waxes you can use and the melting points of each. It is important to note that these melting points are only a guide. The actual melting point will vary depending on the factors mentioned above. In most cases, waxes you have purchased will have a melting point on the label for the specific wax. The waxes in the tables below are for pure wax blends. We will also cover several popular waxes for guidance.

Hold up a minute! If you are new to candle-making, we have the perfect article for you. We have covered the frequently asked questions of new candle makers that we encourage you to read!

What are the melting points for different candle waxes?

Type of Wax (Pure)Melting Point in Fahrenheit (°F)Melting Point in Celsius (°C)
Paraffin Wax115 to 15446 to 68
Beeswax144 to 14962 to 65
Soy Wax120 to 18049 to 82
Rapeseed Wax126 to 13052 to 54
Coconut Wax100 to 10738 to 42
Palm Wax18082

As you can see, all candle waxes are not made equal, and each candle wax has a different melting point that you need to consider during the making process. This truly shows the importance of using a thermometer while you are making candles.

Can candle wax catch on fire?

Candle wax can catch fire once it is heated to its flashpoint temperature. This will happen if exposed to an open flame, so it is essential to stay within safe temperatures and keep melted wax away from open flames. All candle waxes have a flashpoint, which is the temperature at which the vapours emitted by the wax can catch fire. The lower the flashpoint, the easier it is for the wax to catch fire.

The table below shows the flashpoints for different types of candle waxes. As you can see, some waxes have a very low flashpoint and should be used cautiously. This is another reason why thermometers are so crucial in candle making, especially with waxes with lower flashpoints.

The below temperatures are a general guide, and you must read the label of your specific wax. Each wax should state the flash point of the wax; in the case that the flash point is not present – if you want further guidance, reach out to the manufacturer.

What are the different flashpoints of candle wax?

Type of Wax (Pure)Flash Point in Fahrenheit (°F)Flash Point in Celsius (°C)
Paraffin Wax390199
Beeswax400204
Soy Wax450232
Rapeseed Wax248120
Coconut Wax350176
Palm Wax450232

From the table above, it is clear why thermometers are crucial within the wax melting process; this is why you need to monitor your temperatures throughout the whole process.

What temperature do you need to add fragrance oils to your candle wax?

The temperature that you need to add fragrance oils to your candle wax will vary depending on the type of wax being used.

For most types of wax, the fragrance oil should be added when the wax is between 150-205°F (66-96°C). This allows the fragrance oil to bind to the wax and prevents it from evaporating.

However, as we mentioned before, each type of wax is different, so it is essential to check the specific guidelines for your wax. You will find this information on the label or manufacturer’s website. If you cannot find this information, it is always best to err on the side of caution and add the fragrance oil when the wax is between 170 -185°F (77-85°C).

What temperatures do you need to add fragrance oils to different waxes?

Below you will find a table of different types of waxes and the temperatures that you need to add the fragrance oil for the best cold and hot throw possible.

Type of Wax (Pure)Add Fragrance Oil at Fahrenheit (°F)Add Fragrance Oil at Celsius (°C)
Paraffin Wax185 to 20085 to 93
Beeswax150 to 16066 to 71
Soy Wax185 to 20085 to 93
Rapeseed Wax170 to 18577 to 85
Coconut Wax200 to 20593 to 96
Palm Wax200 to 20593 to 96

Do fragrance oils catch fire?

All fragrance oils have a flashpoint, which is the temperature at which the vapours emitted by the fragrance oil can catch fire. The lower the flashpoint, the easier it is for the fragrance oil to catch fire. If exposed to an open flame they can quickly ignite. Some fragrance oils have a low flash point so you need to be aware that these essential oils are highly flammable.

What is the flashpoint of fragrance oil?

The flashpoint for fragrance oils is between 141 and 200°F (60 and 93°C). This means that the fragrance oil will catch fire if exposed to an open flame. It is important that you read the instruction for your fragrance oil and do not add the fragrance oil when the wax is too hot or cold.

What temperatures do you need to add essential oils to different waxes?

Below you will find a table of the average temperatures that you should add essential oils to your melted wax. Use the essential oil labels and manufacturer websites to determine the specific temperature for your product:

Type of Wax (Pure)Add Essential Oil at Fahrenheit (°F)Add Essential Oil at Celsius (°C)
Paraffin Wax15870
Beeswax15870
Soy Wax14060
Rapeseed Wax170 to 18577 to 85
Coconut Wax200 to 20593 to 96
Palm Wax200 to 20593 to 96

Do essential oils catch fire?

Similarly to fragrance oils, all essential oils have a flashpoint, which is the temperature at which the vapours emitted by the essential oil can catch fire. The lower the flashpoint, the easier it is for the essential oil to catch fire. Some essential oils have very low flash points meaning they are highly flammable – you must be cautious when using essential oils and ensure that no open flames are present during the process.

What is the flashpoint of essential oil?

Essential oil flashpoints can range from 50°C to 110°C (122°F to 230°F). This means that the essential oil will catch fire if exposed to an open flame. It is important that you read the instruction for your essential oil and do not add the essential oil when the wax is too hot or cold.

What temperature do you add colour dye to wax?

When adding colour dye to your candle, it is important to add it at the same time as your essential oil. This will help to ensure that the colour is evenly distributed throughout the wax.

The temperature that you need to add your colour dye will vary depending on the type of wax being used. For most types of wax, the colour dye should be added when the wax is between 140-158°F (60-70°C).

However, as we mentioned before, each type of wax is different, so it is essential to check the specific guidelines for your wax. You will find this information on the label or manufacturer’s website. Please refer to the tables above for further guidance on when to add your dye at the same time as your essential or fragrance oil.

What temperature do you need to pour your wax?

The pouring temperature for most types of wax is between 104-140°F (54-60°C). This temperature range will help ensure that your candles do not crack and develop air pockets while providing an even surface and burn.

However, as we mentioned before, each type of wax is different, so it is essential to check the specific guidelines for your wax. You will find this information on the label or manufacturer’s website. Please refer to the table below for average pour temperatures of pure waxes.

What temperatures do you need to pour different waxes?

The table below shows pouring temperatures for different wax types to guide candle makers:

Type of Wax (Pure)Pour Wax at Fahrenheit (°F)Pour Wax at Celsius (°C)
Paraffin Wax155 to 16568 to 74
Beeswax16071
Soy Wax120 to 14049 to 60
Rapeseed Wax10440
Coconut Wax14563
Palm Wax188 to 20387 to 95

Now that we have covered the critical temperatures that you need to monitor during the candle-making process. Let’s talk about choosing the best thermometer for your candle-making journey.

What are the different types of thermometers available for candle making?

There are several different types of thermometers available for candle making. The most common type is the digital thermometer. These thermometers are easy to use and give an accurate reading.

Other thermometers include glass, mercury, and infrared thermometers. Glass and mercury thermometers are less accurate than digital thermometers but can be more durable. Infrared thermometers are the most precise type, but they can be more expensive.

How do you choose the right thermometer for your needs?

When choosing a thermometer for your candle-making needs, you should consider the wax you are using and the accuracy you need. If you are using soft wax, such as coconut wax, you won’t need a thermometer that reaches high temperatures with a melting point of 100 to 107°F. If you use harder wax, such as palm wax, you will need a thermometer that can reach higher temperatures with a melting point of 180°F.

If you need a highly accurate reading, choose an infrared thermometer. These thermometers can be more expensive due to the increased accuracy. If you don’t need a highly accurate reading, a digital thermometer will work well and is more affordable. A more precise thermometer can be highly advantageous if you make candles that need to be the same as the previous batches. You may want to consider this if you make candles professionally and sell them to customers who expect the same quality every time!

No matter what type of thermometer you choose, make sure it is durable and easy to use. Candle making can be messy, so you’ll want a thermometer that can withstand being dropped or getting wax on it. You’ll also want a long cord or probe thermometer to reach the wax without getting to reduce the chance of you getting burnt by the hot wax.

Tips for choosing the suitable thermometer

Follow the below tips to ensure that you gain the right thermometer for your needs:

  • Consider the type of wax being used and the desired accuracy.
  • If using hard wax, choose a thermometer that can reach higher temperatures.
  • If you need a highly accurate reading, choose an infrared thermometer.
  • If accuracy is not as important, a digital thermometer will work well and is more affordable.
  • Make sure the thermometer is durable and easy to use.
  • Consider getting a thermometer with a long cord or probe for ease of use. You can also opt for a wireless thermometer, as this is our preferred option.

Final Thoughts

A thermometer is an essential tool for any candle maker. It helps you avoid making common mistakes that can ruin your candles. It also makes achieving consistent results with each batch of candles you make. When choosing a thermometer, consider the wax you are using and the accuracy you need. There are several different types of thermometers available, so you should be able to find one that meets your needs.

Happy candle-making!

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